Write a Resume

Write a resume is that will show your accomplishments and interest every hiring manager!.  This is very important when you go in to apply for a job. This is the first piece of who you are, that stays with them after you leave the interview room. Make sure you’re up-to-date on the latest practices and styles for your specific job.

Length

A resume should be long enough to cover important details and accomplishments, but short enough to attract and keep the reader’s attention. Only on rare occasions should a resume be more than two pages. If you need more information, then end the resume with “Additional information and references readily available.” Academia is the exception to this rule, but in commercial settings, hold to two pages.

Style

There are functional, chronologic, and reverse chronologic resume styles.

Functional resumes highlight your skills and accomplishments and work best when you have been doing the same type of work for many years. Start with an objective, then a summary, a section on your education or professional training, follow with a skills or accomplishments section, then end with a job history.

Reverse Chronologic resumes almost always throw the reader a curve ball. Only use this style when you need to tell a story or when your most applicable experience was early in your career.

Chronologic resumes are still the most common and easiest to read. Use this format unless you have a need to use another. Start with a well-written objective, then job history or education (education first if you have less than five years professional experience), a skills section will finish this nicely.

Quantify and Qualify

Engage the reader of your resume. Tell a good story with lots of details. When you say that you were responsible for something, describe the size or otherwise qualify the statement.

For example, rather than saying “Responsible for hiring, supervising, and training the sales force along with sales, loss prevention and merchandising the store,” you present yourself in a much better light when you say, “Recruited and developed a staff of over 100 in a 100,000 sq. ft. store with $11M in sales. Improved loss prevention by 10%. Won company wide award for store presentation.”